Website Review

 

by Janice Rodriguez

July is for the second part of our discussion on aphasia, apraxia, and other communication problems, focusing treatment and rehabilitation. First, I will point you a link from the National Aphasia Association website: “Research Update 2002: Aphasia Therapy in the New Millennium” by Kristine Lundren and Martin Albert, http://www.aphasia.org/newsletter/Spring2002/ResearchUpdate.html. The references in the end of the “Research Update” article will lead you to the original research article.

 

For example: You want to see the research on the last entry, “Walker-Batson, D., Curtis, S., Natarajan, R., et al. (2001). A double blind, placebo controlled study of the use of amphetamine in the treatment of aphasia. Stroke, 32, 2093-2098.” Now, enter the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)/National Library of Medicine (NLM) website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/. Click on the first word after the logo in the top left, “PubMed.” You are now ready to find the original article. Enter two or three search terms from the reference entry, like “amphetamine aphasia” and click GO. You should see the article listed. Of course, this does not mean that amphetamines are an accepted or safe treatment of aphasia, however, you and loved ones could discuss these treatments with your doctor.

 

There are aphasia programs all over the world. Again, see the National Aphasia Association website, http://www.aphasia.org/NAAweblinks.html#ac to see a lengthy list. Add this “Constraint-Induced Aphasia Therapy” program in California, also, http://www.advancedrecovery.org/. In the June Web Review, we learn how to find a speech therapist in your area. As you know, you must discuss these programs with your doctors and therapists.

 

With the help of Joan Green, M.A.CCC-SLP, from www.innovativespeech.com, I want to close this review with computer therapy, which I have used successfully. Computers are not for everybody and you should discuss software tools with an experienced therapist. Here are three websites where you can find good, inexpensive software tools:

 

* Universal Reader - Reads text from anything you highlight.

* Ultimate Talking Dictionary - Reads definitions and helps you think of words. http://www.premier-programming.com/Products.htm

 

* Rosetta Stone - comprehensive program for listening comprehension, reading, speaking and writing; look for the free demo at the site www.rosettastone.com

Amazon.com has “Rosetta Stone English Explorer” for $19.95

 

*Talk Now! English - $9.95

http://store.yahoo.com/software-blowouts/talnowamenje.html

 

This is just a sample from Joan Green‘s list - if you have any questions about these software tools, email me at jrodriguez@strokenetwork.org and I will forward them to Joan. Thanks, and see you next time!

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